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Tarasoff v. Regents of University of California


The Tarasoff Principle

If the counselor knows or has reason to know of probable harm to another identifiable
person or the property of an identifiable person, a warning must be issued if the client’s behavior cannot be controlled.

The “Tarasoff Principle” was established by a court ruling in the Tarasoff v. Regents of University of California case in 1976 (17. Cal. 3d 425 - July 1, 1976. S. F. No. 23042).
 
For more information on the Tarasoff principle see:
Ethical, Legal, and Professional Issues in Counseling by Remley and Herlihy (2001).

For more information on the application of Tarasoff to supervisors see:
Fundamentals of Clinical Supervision by Bernard & Goodyear (1998)